Bombs in London and Glasgow

“Severe” Meaning Further Terrorist Attacks Likely. “Severe” was after the bomb in London. Now since the attempted suicide bomb in Glasgow the status is “Critical”.

Glasgow Airport Bomb Attempt

The UK will “not be intimidated” by terrorist attacks, Home Secretary Jacqui Smith has told MPs. In a Commons statement, she said it was “through our unity that the terrorist will eventually be defeated”.

Stirring words, but how should I respond as a Christian? I think there are two things to avoid, fear and not hearing.

I was working in a restaurant kitchen in London during the 1970s Irish terrorist bombings. One day I emerged from working in a kitchen under Piccadilly to find the aftermath of a bomb that had exploded. We had only heard a dull thud from where we were working below. Business went on and we continued cooking for the customers who continued coming in.

It was then that I thought the bombers failed to understand our nature – the mindset of the Brits. The greater the threat, the greater the defiance, the greater the determination to deny the terrorists what they wanted. I think the current terrorists are making the same mistake.

I was born after the Second World War and heard accounts of courage and life going on regardless during attack and bombings. I once heard someone from overseas who said Brits are at their best in a crisis. I don’t feel we are in a crisis yet, though still think the current attacks will only bring greater social cohesion and a defiant response.

I believe a Christian is called to to trust in Jesus rather than become a slave to fear.

I was puzzled by the response of the Americans after 9/11. They seemed reluctant to ask themselves why they should be so hated. For some it was more than just reluctance but a deliberate refusal to hear. When some asked “Why?” Others said there could be no reason, no justification, so the question should therefore not be asked.

I ask why now. In the days of the Irish terrorists we knew what they were fighting for. Now I simply do not know what these people want or hope to achieve. I hope someone can articulate it soon. In the mean time I will trust in Jesus knowing I shall live forever.

I will not live in fear.

2 thoughts on “Bombs in London and Glasgow

  1. Isn’t the answer to that question, for the British troops to leave Iraq and Afghanistan? Not that I’m saying the troops should leave. I’m just saying that’s what the terrorists want.

  2. Hi Tim. Thanks for that, but I am not convinced. Why then would they want to target a gay club and the Ministry of Sound night club with “those slags dancing around” (according to a previous court case, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/6466817.stm)?

    I have looked on the web in some Islamic sites and one of them seems to suggest it is all about an individual’s aim of martyrdom and the individual’s belief that it is a short-cut to paradise. The ultimate selfishness I think, if that is the case.

    The early Christian church had a similar problem when, during a time of pursecution, Christian belivers prefered martyerdom as less difficult that living a whole life in service to Jesus.

    If the aim of these terrorists is a short-cut to paradise this is likely to go on for a long time.

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